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Main / Glossary / Weighted Average Method Example

Weighted Average Method Example

Weighted average method example is a term used in finance, specifically in the field of cost accounting. It refers to a technique used to calculate the value of inventory or the cost of goods sold (COGS) by assigning different weights to different units of inventory based on their respective costs. This method is commonly employed by businesses to determine the average cost of goods when there are fluctuations in purchase prices.

The weighted average method example is particularly useful in scenarios where inventory costs are not uniform due to variations in purchase prices or production costs. By considering the quantity and cost associated with each purchase or production batch, it provides a more accurate representation of the overall cost per unit.

To understand how the weighted average method example works, let’s consider a hypothetical scenario. ABC Retail Store purchases 200 units of a certain product over the course of a month. The following table illustrates the quantities and costs associated with each purchase:

| Purchase | Quantity | Cost per Unit |

|———-|———-|—————|

| Purchase 1 | 50 units | $10 |

| Purchase 2 | 100 units | $12 |

| Purchase 3 | 50 units | $15 |

To determine the value of the inventory or COGS using the weighted average method example, we need to calculate the weighted average cost per unit. This is done by multiplying the quantity of each purchase by its respective cost per unit, summing up these values, and dividing by the total quantity.

In our example, the calculation would be as follows:

(50 units $10) + (100 units $12) + (50 units $15) = $500 + $1,200 + $750 = $2,450

Total Quantity = 50 units + 100 units + 50 units = 200 units

Weighted Average Cost per Unit = Total Cost / Total Quantity = $2,450 / 200 units = $12.25

Therefore, the weighted average cost per unit in this scenario is $12.25. This means that each unit in ABC Retail Store’s inventory is valued at $12.25 for cost accounting purposes.

By using the weighted average method example, businesses can accurately determine the cost of goods sold and the value of their inventory, even when prices vary. This method provides a more realistic representation of costs, as it reflects the actual amounts paid for inventory rather than assuming a uniform cost across all units.

In conclusion, the weighted average method example is a valuable tool in finance and cost accounting. It allows businesses to calculate the average cost per unit by assigning different weights to different batches of inventory based on their respective costs. This method provides a more accurate representation of the overall cost of goods sold or the value of inventory, enabling businesses to make informed financial decisions.